5 Tips for Negotiating a Higher Salary

"negotiating salary"

As marketing and account management headhunters, we understand that negotiating salary for many interviewees can be perplexing and, when done incorrectly can have adverse effects on one’s ability to earn a substantial living.

Effects of poor salary negotiation can actually hinder one’s tenure at a job. Not only is the number on the paycheck lower, but underpaid employees tend to be less motivated and respected by their peers.

On the flip side, when salary negotiation is executed correctly, our recruiters have seen that job seekers tend to enjoy more job security, have a heightened focus and ability to execute on necessary tasks.

Unfortunately, many employees go into the negotiation process misinformed, unprepared and, ultimately under compensated. To prevent this from happening, our executive search experts have listed a few tips:

1. Negotiation should be approached logically, not emotionally. Always remain professional; keep emotions and ego in check.

2. Attempt to analyze the situation from the employer’s point of view. Try to understand why they are offering what they are.

3. When counter offering, think risk, reward. If you really want a job, it may not be the best idea to attempt to negotiate that extra bit of compensation as a few thousand dollars isn’t worth a recinded offer.

4. Justify your desired pay on what you can achieve for the employer. If a hiring manager senses you are negotiating out of complete self-interest, they are less likely to agree to your proposed terms.

5. Never take a job strictly for the money. Make sure that you are passionate about the position, enjoy the people in the company and will be afforded enough creativity and autonomy to get the job done correctly. Otherwise, you’ll find yourself on the job market again…quickly.

About the author: Ken Sundheim
Ken Sundheim is the CEO of KAS Placement and the head recruiter. He has been published over 500x on the topics of sales, sales recruitment, marketing, marketing recruitment, entrepreneurship, general business and more. As a sales recruiter, Ken has been asked to speak at some of the most prestigious U.S. universities and has been featured in AOL, Business Insider, Forbes, Chicago Tribune, Huffington Post, Wall St. Journal and many others. As a recruiter, Ken has also appeared on MTV and Fox Business News.